-Currently reading... William Shakespeare's Star Wars: Verily, A New Hope, by Ian Doescher.

2020 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012

2020

- Caballito Loco/Carnavalito, de Ana María Matute

- Óscar y los hombres rana, de Carmen Kurtz

- A mathematician's lament, by Paul Lockhart (book)

- De vita beata, de Séneca

- The Black Swan, by Nassim Nicholas Taleb

- The Strangest Man, the Hidden Life of Paul Dirac, by Graham Farmelo

- Ten Arguments for Deleting your Social Media Accounts Right Now, by Jaron Lanier

- Fooled by Randomness, by Nassim Nicholas Taleb

- Into the Magic Shop, by James R. Doty

- Pet Sematary, by Stephen King

- Días extraños, de Ray Loriga

- Bajo los cielos de Asia, de Iñaki Ochoa de Olza

- The Andromeda Strain, by Michael Crichton

- Beethoven, de Maynard Solomon

- Spooky Action at a Distance, by George Musser

- Stuff Maters, by Mark Miodownik

- La Metamorfosis, de Franz Kafka

- La hija de Vercingetórix, de Jean-Yves Ferri y Didier Conrad

- The Vital Question, by Nick Lane

- The Way of Zen, by Alan W. Watts



2019

- Sapiens, a brief history of humankind, by Yuval Noah Harari

- The Three-Body Problem, by Cixin Liu

- How not to be wrong, by Jordan Ellenberg

- The Joy of X, by Steven Strogatz

- A mathematician's lament, by Paul Lockhart (manifesto)

- Miss Peregrine's home for Peculiar Children, by Ransom Riggs

- Pingüino perdido, de Andrei Kurkov

- Can't Hurt Me, by David Goggins

- Men of Mathematics, vol.I, Eric Temple Bell

- I, Asimov, by Isaac Asimov

- Mozart in the Jungle, by Blair Tindall

- Quiet, by Susan Cain

- Wherever you go, there you are, by Jon Jabat-Zinn



2018

- Take Control of the Noisy Class, by Rob Plevin

- Muerte con pingüino, de Andrei Kurkov

- Caves of Steel, by Isaac Asimov

- Mozart in the Jungle, by Blair Tindall

- Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down, by J.E. Gordon

- The Glass Cage, by Nicholas Carr

- Way of the Ascetics, by Tito Colliander

- Way of the Peaceful Warrior, by Dan Millman

- Storm in a Teacup, by Helen Cerski

- The Shallows: what the internet is doing to our brains, by Nicholas Carr

- The Mathematics of Love: Patterns, Proofs, and the Search for the Ultimate Equation, by Hannah Fry



2017

- The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck, by Mark Manson

- Tau zero, by Poul Anderson.

- 1984, by George Orwell.

- Dataclysm, by Christian Rudder.

- Frankenstein , by Mary W. Shelley.

- No is not enough , by Naomi Klein.

- This changes everything , by Naomi Klein.

- The Invention of Nature , by Andrea Wulf.

- The Shock Doctrine , by Naomi Klein.

- Never at Rest , by Richard Westfall.

- Foundation and Earth, by Isaac Asimov.

- Foundation's Edge, by Isaac Asimov.

- Second Foundation , by Isaac Asimov.

- Foundation and Empire , by Isaac Asimov.

- Foundation , by Isaac Asimov.

- Forward the Foundation , by Isaac Asimov.

- Prelude to Foundation , by Isaac Asimov.

-Foundation, by James Lovelock.



2016

-Gut: The Inside Story of Our Body's Most Underrated Organ, by Giulia Enders.

-The vanishing face of Gaia, by James Lovelock.

-Ahsoka, by E.K. Johnston.

-The extended phenotype, by Richard Dawkins.

-Music in the Castle of Heaven, by John Elliot Gardiner.

-Gaia: A New Look at Life on Earth, by James Lovelock.

-Why genes are not selfish and people are nice, by Colin Tudge.

-Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury.

-Congo, by Michael Crichton.



2015

-Fleet:the complete collection, by Andrew D. Thaler.

-Prepared, by Andrew D. Thaler.

-The Martian, by Andy Weir.

-The power of concentration, by Theron Q. Dumont.

-Good food for everyone forever, by Colin Tudge.

-Love and Math: The Heart of Hidden Reality, by Edward Frenkel .

-Alan Turing, the Enigma, by Andrew Hodges .

2014

-What Do You Care What Other People Think?, by Richard Feynman.

-Zorba the Greek, by Nikos Kazantzakis.

-The Now Habit, by Neil Fiore.

-The Mystery Method, by Mystery.

-From eternity to here, by Sean M. Carroll.

-The science of Interstellar, by Kip Thorne.

-The secret life of birds, by Colin Tudge.

-Jaws, by Peter Benchley.

-Tirant lo Blanc, by Joanot Martorell.

-Amar después de la muerte o el Tuzaní de la Alpujarra, by Calderón de la Barca. Cada lectura se disfruta al menos desde un punto de vista. En este caso esta obra me ha parecido un poco aburrida, no demasiado brillante viniendo de quien viene. Pero me toca tan de cerca la localización alpujarreña que he disfrutado imaginando todas esas escenas en uno de los principales lugares de mi infancia. Nunca había leído una obra ambientada en tierras alpujarreñas y aquí las descripciones que se hacen de ella son bellas aunque poco específicas. Me ha gustado también que la perspectiva de Calderón no sea precisamente monárquica, y que los moriscos adquieran un protagonismo sin precedentes. Hay momentos de gran intensidad y otros de mucho humor, como cuando Al-Cuz-Cuz dice llamarse Arroz a un cristiano. Pero en general no me ha hecho vibrar demasiado. (Enlace a Cervantes Virtual.)

-Luis Pérez el Gallego, by Calderón de la Barca. Empiezo una serie de lecturas de obras de Calderón, del cual solo conocía La Vida es Sueño por haberla visto en un teatro. La historia de Luis Pérez es al principio un poco compleja pero va ganando fuerza y claridad con el tiempo. Acostumbrado a los pocos cambios de lugar de Lope, en esta obra hay constantes saltos geográficos que no me quedaban claros a la primera. Los versos son de gran calidad, aunque esperaba algo de más nivel filosófico. Quizás no todas sus obras sean del calado de la que ya conocía... (Enlace a Cervantes Virtual.)

-Las bizarrías de Belisa, by Lope de Vega. Esta es de momento la última obra de Lope que me leo tras una larga devoción al fénix del teatro. Una vez más tenemos una obra llena de gracia y versos inspirados con una historia de amores y faldas. Belisa es uno de esos grandes personajes femeninos que queriéndose superiores al amor acaban sucumbiendo en él de forma estrepitosa. Una historia divertida y ligera, que no es poco. (Enlace a Cervantes Virtual.)

-Las flores de Don Juan (Rico y pobre trocados), by Lope de Vega. Una obra magnífica llena de toques morales pero hechos con bastante gracia. Casi una utopía el pensar en un hombre con tanta integridad y en una mujer capaz de verla y apreciarla... Muy entretenida y llena de versos sublimes y verdades como puños. La historia de dos hermanos diferentes como la noche y el día, lejanos entre sí por una inmensidad. (Enlace a Cervantes Virtual.)

2013

-The selfish gene, by Richard Dawkins. Well, this is one of the most intelligent science books I have ever read. Its position as a sience classic is well justified. It is extremely well written and it keeps its engaging prose even through some tough and dense discussions. But the important thing is that this book has made me think a lot. The perspective of the gene is fascinating, and its implications for concepts such as altruism, cooperation or even deception is far reaching. There is one negative thing, however: the machine is put under its proper role. I think there is more to say about machines. Genes are hugely important players, but to me are dead entities. I will soon publish a text on this topic, so keep it tuned with the publications section! And read this amazing book as soon as possible! (Link to Google Books.)

-Prime Obsession, by John Derbyshire. This book is also about the prime numbers but more oriented towards the Riemman Hypothesis. It should be harder to read to a non-technical reader but I extremely enjoyed all its details. Thank God some authors are not afraid of using equations and mathematics. In this book you can grasp many details of one of the greatest unsolved problems. If you are trying to understand such problem and maybe to attempt to solve it, this is your book. (Link to Google Books.)

-The Music of the Primes, by Marcus du Sautoy. Caught by the bug of the primes I dedided to read this amazing and extremely clear book about these fascinating numbers. It combines mathematical and historical background in a very pedagogical way. Once you begin you cannot stop reading it. I have become very excited not only with primes and the Riemann Hypothesis, but also with factorisation of RSA numbers and other extremely interesting topics. I feel tempted now to make a bit of research in these topics. The dream to solve the Riemann Hypothesis is too daring, though. (Link to Wikipedia.)

-The Millennium Problems, by Keith Devlin. This is an excellent and not-too-brief exposition of the seven famous Clay problems, each one rewarded with a 1M$. It is outdated in the sense that the Poincaré Conjecture is already solved by Grigori Perelman. He showed in 2003 that Poincaré was right. He, however, declined the award... The book is at a nice intermediate point between the official book, which is too short and technical, and more detailed and specific books devoted to a single problem. This is the type of books that does not teach you a lot but brings a huge motivation to seek for more. It is important to say that the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture and the Hodge conjecture are so difficult to even state, specially the latter, that even such a pedagogical author has a great problem explaining them. Almost surely you will skip the last two chapters, as I more or less did. This book has been my first contact with the Riemann Hypothesis and now the bug is on me. (Link to Amazon.)

-The man who loved only numbers, by Paul Hoffman. Incredible and extremely fun to read biography of one of the most important mathematicians of the XXth century, Paul Erdős (pronounced Erdish). It is difficult to find someone with a similar passion for his/her job. Most of us will consider that Erdős was a crazy-sick man, but I really admire his passion. I am divided by different passions and this makes me a lot weaker. I hope he's with the SF reading directly from the book... (Link to Wikipedia.)

-Motel Malibú, by Pablo Poveda Sánchez. Un libro muy interesante. Lo he leído porque me lo pasó un amigo que es primo del autor y me ha sorprendido el nivel de su prosa y la fuerza con la que te atrapan sus personajes. Violencia, estilo lapidario y filosofía de estar de vuelta de todo. Si lo hubiera leído siendo adolescente me habría gustado aún más. (Cómpralo en Amazon.es.)

-The Complete Robot, by Isaac Asimov. This is more than a fantastic book. It is delightful from beginning and (mostly) to end. The last stories are masterpieces, but all of them contain the footprint of an extremely clever mind. Of course, you will fall in love with Susan Calvin. Along this collection you will cry and laugh, but most of all they will make you think. You cannot ask more from a collection of stories. The perfect book for robot lovers. (Link to Wikipedia.)

-Querer la propia desdicha, by Lope de Vega. Otra obra magnífica de Lope en la que el Rey es un personaje principal y bastante peculiar. Enredos y más enredos. Reconozco que tras tantas obras de Lope ya estoy un poco mareado... (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-La Vengadora de las Mujeres, by Lope de Vega. Los dos primeros actos son muy brillantes. El tercero no me gustó tanto, pero las reflexiones sobre feminismo y sobre la el amor a los libros y a la razón son suficientes para leer esta obra. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-3001: The Final Odyssey , by Arthur C. Clarke. The beginning is so, so unexpected... Even though most of the book is about such unexpected start and not about the monoliths, etc, it is a fascinating, almost independent novel. It is the dream of every man! When the end comes and things get more serious, I find the book a bit precipitate. The end deserved a better resolution, I think, or at least better explained. However, it is most original. And the moral is to think a lot about some viruses... A very surprising aspect is that intelligent computers seem to be missing from the 3001 world. Quite a curious fact, since already at 2001 HAL was so able... In all, the 4-saga is not exactly a saga since every book you gain some things and lose others, sometimes for good, sometimes for worse, but I enjoyed a lot the whole perspective. The ET perspective is so necessary for us as an arrogant species... I hope we can find a monolith very soon, or at least a clear sign of superior species. (Link from Wikipedia).

-2061: Odyssey Three , by Arthur C. Clarke. Even though I enjoyed this third odyssey and could not stop reading it, it is not as brilliant as its predecessors. I don't see the point of recruiting non scientific famous people inside Universe. To me, the interesting action is on Europa, and most of the book doesn't orbit around it. The end, however, is most intriguing. (Link from Wikipedia).

-2010: Odyssey Two , by Arthur C. Clarke. From all the novels in the saga, this is where the real adventure happens. The location where Discovery is stuck is revisited, where HAL awaits... The character of Chandra is extremely interesting, though not developed to the point of (my) satisfaction. Europa is teeming with life and the monoliths are a bit less misterious. It was difficult to imagine how the star child could appear in a sequel. Too powerful and non-human to be bearable in a book. But Dave Bowman turns out to be a still human and interesting role. The book is extremely engaging. I had the feeling of being inside the Odyssey, soaring the solar system inside Leonov. The birth of Lucifer is what I enjoyed more. (Link from Wikipedia).

-2001: A Space Odyssey , by Arthur C. Clarke. Expect a novel very faithful to the film, or viceversa. With the novel you will probably understand more things concerning the mission of Discovery, but the great references to Nietzsche of the film are not so evident. Probably it was Kubrik the Nietzsche fan... In short, the novel is as great, as the movie, and it is a nice shuttle to jump to the three sequels, which promise to be very exciting (now I am reading 2010 with great delight). The novel is more SETI-like than the movie as well. While Kubrik leaves the ET's silent and mysterious, Clarke explicitly describes them and we can witness their direct actions on us. (Link from Wikipedia).

-The Origin of Life, by Paul Davies. First of all I'd like to say that this is an excellent book and I enjoyed and learned a lot by reading it. However, don't expect a book on the question of what is life. The actual title, the origin of life, is exactly the topic that is covered. And they are two very different things. It's true that the first chapter is devoted to philosophical aspects, but the author is not really writing with philosophical depth. We can find the typical discussion (or naive denigration) of the vitalistic approach. As if language itself were not vitalist in essence, or as if vitalism were just a crackpot scientific theory and not a highly complex phenomenologic view of life by alive beings... But OK, we can skip this section and go ahead to the heart of the book, which is the origin of life, at least life as we know it (it is difficult not to be Earth-centric in this topic). The last part of the book is a presentation of one of the original theories of the author: the mutual contamination between Mars and Earth. I think it is at least a very plausible hypothesis and also very intriguing. As a bonus, you learn a lot of things concerning Mars. I think this is a very clever book written by a very clever scientist. The con is clearly the pseudophilosophical first part, but it is worth reading it. (Link from Amazon.co.uk).

-The Eerie Silence, by Paul Davies. A must read if you are interested in the SETI project, either for expanding your knowledge on the topic or for an introduction. Paul Davies is not as passionate as Carl Sagan (at least he does not express it) but gives a serious an updated unaccount on the search for (not only intelligent) life outside (and not only outside) Earth. This book has taught me many amazing facts and has made me think a lot. Highly recommended. (Link from Wikipedia).

-La Noche de San Juan, by Lope de Vega. Una obra muy especial para una noche muy especial. Un buen ejemplo de que el casarse por amor y no por acuerdo ya era algo que se planteaba mucho antes del romanticismo. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-Ya anda la de Mazagatos, by Lope de Vega. Obra bastante desconocida. Es una locura de faldas. Tenemos al mismo rey en situaciones bastante poco honrosas... (Enlace de la Biblioteca de Universia).

-La Villana de Getafe, by Lope de Vega. Deliciosa obra de amor, desamor y cortejos. Sin desperdicio. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-The End of Time, by Julian Barbour. This is a most original and interesting book. Written by a truly brave man, who defies both mainstream physics as well as the conventional career that forces you to pursue quantity and impact factor instead of quality and depth. The work and life of Dr. Barbour seems to me really exemplar and encouraging. Focusing on the book itself, I think we have to admit that this is not a book for everyone. I am not saying it is too tough for a non-physicist or mathematician, but there is something that I don't understand: the book is not for the general public, maybe just for a genius or two. So what is the point to write without equations and without more technical terms? I went through red, green and blue mists for more than 300 pages, but maybe to define probability amplitudes at the beginning would have been more suitable for the actual readers. I find the proposals of the author extremely interesting, and definetely I will look for Mach's work. However, I really miss the actual theory of the author. Sometimes during my reading I became confused on what is the author contribution and what is the already existent theory. And of course I miss the actual theory, with the equations, examples and more details. At least in a technical appendix! I have the feeling that this book is not the perfect reflection of the research of the author. Such proposals deserve better explanations, more details, more clarity. There is some point at which you think whether the actual theory will appear on the book or not. And such question remained unsatisfied after I finished it. As a preliminary work it is OK, It is full of very clever and suggestive discussions, but I think that J. Barbour should write another book on his Platonia from scratch, without being afraid of giving more details to the reader. There are many science divulgation books which are very well written but with lack of original ideas. Well, this book is just the opposite. It is pregnant with ideas but not perfectly explained as such fertility deserves. And I, of course, prefer the later! I am looking forward to read more of this topic from the author. Probably I will have to go to his scientific articles. In all, The End of Time has made me think a lot, which is the best thing you can say from an author and his/her book. (Find it on Amazon.com).

-Life's Ratchet, by Peter M. Hoffmann. This book is directly related with my PhD thesis, since both texts talk about molecular motors. So I expected a lot more from such attractive title. The introduction is very easy to follow and full of fascinating facts. But then the author completely twists the attitude and we are face to face to very specific discussions on biological details. I became quite disappointed because the author seems to think, like me, that molecular machines can be defined as minimum alive beings but he does not deepen in this issue. From a book with such title I expected him to talk more about what life is and how motor proteins are plugged into its definition. But no deep philosophy here. On the other hand, the technical discussion of how chemical energy is converted into mechanical work, which is the big question of the field and maybe the big question for understanding life at a fundamental level, remains as obscure as it can be. I think that the author darkens the question with some unfortunate decisions. The subtitle of the book is how molecular machines extract order from chaos. This is a misguiding sentence. The author is playing at the edge of second law violation. Fortunately, the book explains how the consumed free energy is the ultimate responsible for such order, but this subtitle, and many sentences in the book, lead to think for some moments that motor proteins are Maxwell demons. While thermal motion is extremely important for these machines to work, I would not dare to make such fancy affirmations because the non-expert reader can be mislead. The order comes from the order of the energetic input and from the anisotropy and polarity of cell structures such microtubules or actin filaments, which seem to play almost no role in this book. This is a big mistake. Motor proteins like kinesins or myosins cannot be described without a close relation with their tracks. Such tracks are not secondary players, and this book dedicates very little to them. Thermal motion allows these systems to explore the phase space with more efficiency, but concepts such as diffusional search, which are common in motor proteins field, are quite dangerous because diffusion is, by definition, unbiased. The bias is introduced by other factors that are not random at all. Moreover, the author insists on calling chaos to thermal motion or noise. This can be a little confusing. It is true that a general definition of chaos can include disorder, but in physics we normally distinguish between the stochastic and the chaotic. The stochastic is what we have to describe with probabilities because we know nothing of the internal variables. We do not have deterministic rules for them. It is a coarse grained approach, and it applies to thermal motion in the cell environment. On the other hand, chaos seems to me a word more appropriated to deterministic systems where there is an exponential divergence between two histories that are very similar at their initial conditions. I would have not used the therm chaos in the context of this book, but noise, stochasticity or simply undeterministic motion. Finally, it is significant to read the description of the kinesin-1 motor mechanism. In such description, the phantom of second-law violation flies close. The author arrives to the paroxism of saying that What is striking, however, is that the main source of energy, the hydrolysis of ATP, does not seem to be directly used for locomotion. To me, this is a defect of many models of such motors, that they rely so much on the power of thermal motion that they underestimate the role of ATP, which has to be the key player. Of course, the author considers ATP as a crucial player, but not to the degree that it deserves. For example, if one head of the kinesin performs a diffusional search, why such searches is almost always directed to the plus-end of the microtubule? He mentions the tilted profile of the microtubule in a very obscure fashion, when such important thing would deserve more pages of the book than any other topic. I do not blame the author, though. He seems to be close to some researchers who strongly rely on the role of the noise but not on deterministic forces. It is still a controversial subject and maybe the author could have been more open to discuss other alternative theories which are more deterministic (but with thermal noise as a key player). To summarize, I enjoyed reading the book, mostly the first half, but I think that a non-expert reader can extract wrong conclusions, or at least clear conclusions on a topic that today remains dark. Finally, from a philosophical point of view, this book is very deficient. This topic is too important to avoid deep discussions. As it is typical when some physicists write about life, they naively make fun of vitalism and celebrate technology without providing deep conceptual discussions. (Find it on Amazon.com).

-The Natural Philosophy of Time, by G.J. Whitrow. To me, working on the subject of time, this book is a must. It is referenced by almost everyone working in the subject. Moreover, the author is also the author of Time in History, a magnificent book already cited here. It has very different parts, each one associated with the role of time in different disciplines such philosophy, physics, biology or even psychology. It is clearly a formal work, not intended for a general reader. Do not expect revolutionary theories or proposals. It is a book that reviews the mainstream, even though the discussion on Zeno's paradoxes is really surprising. In short, it is a classic but only for those with strong background in physics, since the author will not avoid any equation. I would have enjoyed more a book exclusively dedicated to a physical/philosophical viewpoint. (Find it on Amazon.com).

-La prueba de los amigos, by Lope de Vega. De las mejores obras de Lope, sobre todo el primer acto, el cual es extremadamente brillante. El tema principal, la amistad, es tratado con gran profundidad y mantiene una actualidad evidente. El personaje cómico, Galindo, es de lo más ingenioso a la vez que entrañable. Un canto a la generosidad y un aviso para los que se lanzan a ella. Magnífica en todos los sentidos. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-El Arenal de Sevilla, by Lope de Vega. Esta es una obra bastante difícil, sobre todo al principio, donde la acción y las referencias específicas me hicieron perder un poco. Más adelante se retoma el hilo con facilidad, el cual versa sobre amor, disfraces y engaños una vez más. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-La Esclava de su Galán, by Lope de Vega. Un ejemplo de hasta dónde puede alguien autohumillarse para perseguir a su amor. Y también una muestra de lo difícil que es que otros aprecien ese sacrificio. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-Los Melindres de Belisa, by Lope de Vega. Belisa es un personaje para volverse loco. De esos que adoras en escena pero al que odiarís en la vida real. La obra está llena de engaños y equívocos. La oscuridad final es buenísima. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

2012

-Por la puente, Juana, by Lope de Vega. Una obra de costumbres, amor y honor. Los protagonistas viven como personajes dentro de otros, huyendo de su pasado más reciente. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-El premio del bien hablar, by Lope de Vega. Una comedia tardía en la producción de Lope. En ella vemos a Don Juan defender el honor de las mujeres hasta el final. Como siempre, el criado es el que te hace reír. En este caso es Martín, el cual sufre cierto percance con un Mastín... Toda la obra dentro de una sola casa, escondiéndose mútuamente, lo cual da una fuerza escénica enorme. Algunos versos son impagables, como los que regala Leonarda a su padre para defender su libertad de alma y cuerpo. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-Santiago el Verde, by Lope de Vega. Amoríos y requiebros en la fiesta de Santiago el Verde. Las escenas de los sastres fingidos son tremendas. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-El Villano en su Rincón, by Lope de Vega. Esta es una obra magistral. Quizás la que más me ha gustado de Lope hasta la fecha. Una lección de libertad. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-El Sembrar en Buena Tierra, by Lope de Vega. Una obra sencilla y llena de sabiduría. Deliciosa y cándida. Perfecta para una mañana de domingo. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-Los Milagros del Desprecio, by Lope de Vega. Excelente obra. Y sencilla, lo cual la hace perfecta para una representación casera. Un nivel de perfección similar al del Perro del Hortelano. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-La Moza de Cántaro, by Lope de Vega. De esta obra sorprende mucho que online se encuentra en cinco actos y sin embargo en mi libro Aguilar del 1946 solo hay tres. Federico Carlos Sáinz de Robles, el encargado de las notas en mi edición, afirma que la versión en cinco actos es una refundición de Cándido María Trigueros. Por eso sorprende que en la Biblioteca Virtual Cervantes haya cuatro entradas pero todas para la versión refundida, la cual a primera vista es casi totalmente diferente. Yo he leído la supuestamente original. Me resulta increíble que esta fuera la obra númuero 1500 del autor. Escribir tantas obras es simplemente una bestialidad. Por otro lado, la obra en sí es muy hermosa pero no de las mejores. Y el final es demasiado precipitado. A veces con Lope esto es una constante, pero en esta obra todo se resuelve en demasiado poco tiempo.

-El Acero de Madrid, by Lope de Vega. Muy buena obra de amoríos y requiebros. Leyéndola me entretuve en ir apuntando todas las conexiones relevantes entre los personajes y me di cuenta de la enorme cohesión que esconde la dramaturgia. Hay doce personajes, y el número (aproximado) de conexiones de cada uno es: Belisa=9, Lisardo=8, Teodora=7, Prudencio=7, Marcela=6, Beltrán=6, Riselo=6, Octavio=6, Prudencio=5, Leonor=4, Salucio=3 y Gerardo=3. Los últimos tres son criados y aun así tienen mucha conectividad. Además de esta cohesión hay muchas simetrías interesantes, como la de Lisardo-Belisa, Riselo-Teodora y Beltrán-Leonor. Quizás no es la mejor obra de Lope, pero un análisis superficial ya revela una gran maestría. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-Ringworld, by Larry Niven. A must read of the Science Fiction genre. I enjoyed it very much. I became fascinated with the role of Teela Brown, even though the luck theory is a fallacy. But it is interesting how you can follow such a lucky girl and interpret all events under her luck. I became a bit disappointed near the end, though. I think the book deserved a much better end, since all the previous action was nearly perfect. (Buy it second hand!).

-Elements, Book I, by Euclid. This is a masterpiece I have always heard of but never read. I decided to follow each proposition with paper, compass and a not marked ruler. You need calm in order to follow the last propositions as they accumulate as the book advances. But it is worth trying. After some time I will try with book II. (Link from archive.org).

-El Castigo sin Venganza, by Lope de Vega. Al principio me ha costado entrar, pero acabas entrando del todo, y entonces el dolor te deja clavado. Terrible, cruel y a la vez con un lirismo que espanta de lo bueno que es. En vida de Lope solo se representó una vez. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-El Anzuelo de Fenisa, by Lope de Vega. Por algún motivo me gustan especialmente las obras de Lope ambientadas en Italia. Esta es enormemente luminosa. El personaje de Fenisa es una delicia. Muy entretenida, perfecta para representar hoy día. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-El Marqués de las Navas, by Lope de Vega. Excelente obra llena de misterio. La temperatura sube mucho al principio y luego desciende hasta una frialdad extrema. Escalofríos me dieron al acabarla. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-A World Without Time, the forgotten legacy of Gödel and Einstein by Palle Yourgrau. This is not a book for everyone. You need to know more than a bit from Einstein's theories of relativity (GR and SR) and from Gödel's famous theorems. The author tries to explain a little bit about them but is not enough for the inexpert reader. However, you can read chunks from it and enjoy the anecdotes from these two geniuses of mathematics and physics. Furthermore, the required philosophical level is high as well, as Gödel was even more a philosopher than a mathematician (according to the author). However, if you are able to understand it (and I recognize that the parts from Gödel theorems was very hard to me) you can enjoy this book. First, it is a romantic attempt to give justice to the figure of Gödel in the fields of philosophy and physics. Second, it comes as a great surprise (to me) that these two brilliant minds were so close to each other. I like how they diverged from mainstream research, pursuing very high goals, how they denied quantum interpretations and how they wanted to deeply understand the world. We all have to thank Palle Yourgrau for writing this, for it is thanks to people like him that important facts are not flushed by the toilet of time. Not an easy book. I would add it is sad in many respects, but I really enjoyed it. As for the title, this book fell in my hands because of my research on the topic of time. But time is not the only main topic of it. However, it is of relevance, since Gödel contributed with a very important result concerning General Relativity. At some extreme rotating universes, there can be closed time-like curves, which allow a time travel, but which means in fact that time as we understand it is not compatible with this. Well, this is an important result. However, my point of view is that it tells more for the probable fail of General Relativity at extreme conditions than for the real universe and time. However, this is still an open topic and the ideas of Gödel should be seriously taken into account. Sadly, mainstream colleagues of his time and from current days do not seem to be opened to his ideas. But I prefer to trust a genius like Gödel than some mainstream charlatans. Link for buying at Amazon.

-La truita cremada by Claudi Mans. Aquest llibre me'l va regalar fa un any la Laia Haurie, doctora en Química, per un amic invisible. I a la fi vaig decidir llegir-ho. Ho he fet mentre dinava, un capítol (un article) cada dia. Ho he trobat molt bo, brillant i divertit. Hi ha articles com el de la taula periòdica que m'han fet plorar de riure. Altres, com el de rentar les camises a l'Índia, m'ha fet pensar. M'ha semblat una bona obra de divulgació amb bon humor i metàfores interessants. Potser m'ha sobrat el discurs sobre la natura i la química, article 22, perquè sembla que era confús i dubtós, però tota la resta està molt bé. Creo que hay versión en castellano, aunque aún no imagino cómo se ha podido traducir el examen sobre la tabla periódica... Ambas versiones se pueden conseguir en algunas librerías o bien solicitándolo al autor (cmans@ub.edu).

-El Caballero de Olmedo, by Lope de Vega. Se me acaban los adjetivos para describir el asombro que me producen las obras de Lope de Vega. Esta obra es asombrosa, una auténtico canto al amor. Leyéndola me he llenado de risas, lágrimas, impotencia y dolor. También me ha sorprendido la crudeza con la que Lope habla de las matanzas de toros en Medina. La sensibilidad y el lirismo que tiene para el amor y para la flor más delicada y la sequedad con la que describe unas fiestas tan sanguinarias. Ya sé que en su época no era corriente mostrar compasión con los toros, pero Lope no era alguien común y realmente me esperaba una descripción de otro calado. De todas formas la obra es apabullante y llena de una sensibilidad que muchos sensibles quisieran. De haber leído esta obra en mi adolescencia habría combustionado de forma instantánea. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-Peribáñez y el Comendador de Ocaña, by Lope de Vega. Obra excepcional, con una fuerza escénica fuera de lo normal. Imagino la enorme fuerza que debe desprender la pintura en casa del pintor. Las escenas con los campesinos durmiendo en la calle son memorables. Supongo que hay la tentación de ver una moral que haga al Comendador el malo y a Peribáñez el bueno, pero al menos bajo mi punto de vista no está tan claro. Desde luego, el Comendador tiene amor puro, aunque métodos torpes y poco nobles, pero Peribáñez destila un amor mucho más mediocre, mediocre como él mismo y su condición. Lo que pasa es que habla bajo el increíble verso de Lope de Vega y eso le quita la mediocridad a cualquiera. Basta leer justo al principio las preciosas declaraciones de amor que se hacen los novios para constatarlo. El final me parece muy abrupto desde el punto de vista del Comendador. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-About Time (Einstein's Unfinished Revolution), by Paul Davies. This is a very nice introductory book to the topic of time. It is very well explained and it's not boring, except during the discussions of time travels. I usually get bored when the subject becomes too speculative. At the beginning I didn't know that the author was aware of the work by Huw Price. The objections of Price concerning double standard approaches deserves much more attention. The author simply mentions it very briefly, and then proceeds to discuss other speculative things. He says that Price has attacked the physicists. Well, this is unfair. He reasoned some arguments againsts some theories. This is not an attack, and it is not a good approach to be such a corporatist. The author only mentions the very serious reasoning of Price and spends pages and pages on extremely speculative aspects. By the way, he says that parallel universes are an escape for Price objections, but this is not enough. I expected more in this aspect. It is worth mentioning that Price says in his book of the Archimedes point that Hawking never replied to him. Frankly, Price's is still the best book I have read on the topic of time arrow and similar. Paul Davies does not talk on the initial entropy as the target problem for the arrow of time, which is pretty incredible. However, I consider it as a very nice book, very entertaining and engaging. One point to Davies over Price is that Davies discuss the case of kaons! In order to understand the examples from the quantum chapter you may go for an introduction to double slit experiments first. Otherwise it can be hard to follow. (Link from the author page).

-Los Novios de Hornachuelos, by Lope de Vega. Es una obra muy divertida. Esta es de las que el Rey es presentado como un auténtico héroe. Lope parece tener una visión muy bipolar sobre los reyes... Me gusta sobre todo la forma en que se odian los novios nada más verse. ¡Cuántas parejas habrá habido así!

-Flatterland, by Ian Stewart. I cannot recommend this book. I became extremely bored reading it. The title reads "Like Flatland, only more so". Well, this is far from being true. This text tries to be a sequel to the great classic Flatland by Edwin Abbott Abbott. This 1884 novel is a must for those of you who don't know it. And don't expect the movies based on it be neither faithful nor better. It is a brilliant, direct and short book, with scientific and political insight. However, Flatterland is a must not. It is a boring, long and an only scientific oriented book (not to say that some topics are so speculative that cannot be called science yet). It tries to deal with female revolution but the narrative is very poor. One of the first things an author should learn is not to build god-like characters, i.e. protagonists which are perfect, emotionless and do not change through the course of the story. Here the Space Hopper is a detestable character, who does not display any feeling and consequently does not attract the reader at all. After a good start, with the story beginning at Flatland, Vikki is almost kidnapped by the I-know-everything stupid ball, leaving the whole family worried when he could have left a letter from the very beginning. Sometimes he is even very disgusting with Vikki in some replies. Vikki is too good to be true. She is kidnapped but after all she wants to learn all the time. She is the only one having some feelings, but even she is not interesting at all. At the end, when some interest is recovered, the book ends abruptly. So there is not an interesting story because, among other things, there is no story. An odyssey is not enough to build a novel. It needs a conflict at least! If I want to learn science I prefer to read a more serious book. If this is to be a novel, then I need to see conflicts as the gears of every decent novel or literature work. The author, Ian Stewart, is totally an amateur. Concerning more technical details, I would add some comments. First, I purchased the book thinking that the book was about dimensions. The author sometimes confuses dimensions with degrees of freedom, or sometimes completely forgets the topic of dimensions, which is sad. I expected a true sequel to the original, that is, exploring more spatial dimensions. The chapter with fractals is understandable, but there are a lot of things to explore when you jump from 3 to &g;3 spatial dimensions. What is the criterion for the topics covered in the book? It seems pretty random and not faithful to the title. Furthermore, the topics are not well explained. The author tries the enigmatic style of Lewis Carroll but only achieves confusion with no style. Some names are funny, this is the only fun you can get. The reviews included in the book make me think that they don't read the book but the first few chapters. Nature journal says it's "a superb sequel" or "entertaining", which is very far from being true. Make us a favour and let's not associate this poor text as the sequel of the great Flatland. It could be like Flatland, only much worse so. By the way, A² comes from Abbott Abbott=A²!

-Porfiar hasta morir, by Lope de Vega. Mucho podrían aprender los amantes hoy en día de esta obra tan buena. De Nuño y por supuesto de Macías. Ser el hombre perfecto para Clara, mujer perfecta a su vez para él, pero llegar tarde, ¡qué barrera tan aparentemente absurda y a la vez tan grande! A veces pienso que uno es todavía joven en tanto que puede sentir lo que siente un hombre como Macías. Un caballero virtuoso en todas las facetas que simplemente llega a deshora para ser desbancado por otro caballero mediocremente notable. Esta obra hará hervir tu sangre. Quizás estés de acuerdo conmigo en que podría haberse titulado con igual acierto "Castidad hasta matar". (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-La Niña de Plata, by Lope de Vega. Mucho se insiste en el paralelismo entre esta obra y La Estrella de Sevilla, pero eso poco importa a un lector no académico como yo. La Niña de Plata es una obra maravillosa. Con una resolución nunca vista en toda la literatura que conozco. El personaje de la Niña es un caramelo para cualquier actriz con un poco de ambición y buen gusto. Nuevamente descubro cómo Lope hace palidecer a cualquier dramaturgo contemporáneo, por bueno que este sea. Cuando algo tan bueno está tan bien dicho, lo que viene luego parece poca cosa. Todavía me quedan muchas obras de Lope por leer, pero ya puedo decir que ningún autor que conozca me ha dado tanto placer. Y eso que el teatro no es para leerlo, sino para darle vida. ¡Ojalá los grupos de teatro aficionados (y profesionales) rescataran estas joyas en vez de dar tanto bombo a mediocres actuales! Parece que Lope es como la Niña de Plata, una joya brillante que con el tiempo, si no se cuida, ennegrece, pero que guarda su tesoro para el que quiera desoxidarlo. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-Ciencia e Hipótesis (Science and Hypothesis) by Henri Poincaré. (Original title: La Science et l'Hypothèse). This book, first published in 1902, is very special in a lot of ways. First, Poincaré itself. He was one of the best mathematicians of all times, and reading a text by such an incredible mind is always a big responsibility. As a reader, you need to give your best. I have studied some theorems from him in the past, like the one of eternal return, and the depth of his thinking is astonishing. However, this book is intended for the public reader and it is not as tough as one of his technical works. He proposes and suggests many relevant things in such a short space that you get the feeling of being shaked by a genius but without having solved anything at all. He leaves for the (future) reader the solutions. Of course, there are some parts that are a bit old-fashioned, or put in euphemistic words, of hystorical value. However, most of his analysis is still interesting and revolutionary in some way. What I liked most is the way he asks himself about deep concepts like number, magnitude, mass, force... without giving room for faith. Most of the physicist I know are complete believers. They do not lose time by thinking about such philosophical topics... But some laws are in fact definitions, like the F=ma. And some quantities, like mass, are a comfortable ways of expressing a relationship, not absolute parameters given by God. The whole book would be a cure for many scientists which behave like monks. It is impossible to make an overview of such a miscellaneous work. However, what is important is his attitude towards science. Unravelling hidden hypotheses is essential for the good of science. We need awoken minds like Poincaré. Today more than 110 years ago. In particular I love his analysis of probabilities, where you discover that its definition depends on itself! Is such a loose concept the most fundamental measurable quantity of quantum mechanics? Poincaré's book can be a source of incredible inspiration. Let me finish with a part that I think is very relevant today: "We may conceive of ordinary matter as either composed of atoms, whose internals movement escape us, our senses being able to estimate only the displacement of the whole; or we may imagine one of those subtle fluids, which under the name of ether or other names, have from all time played so important a role in physical theories. Often we go further, and regard the ether as the only primitive, or even as the only true matter. The more moderate consider ordinary matter to be condensed ether, and there is nothing startling in this conception; but others only reduce its importance still further, and see in matter nothing more than the geometrical locus of singularities in the ether. Lord Kelvin, for instance, holds what we call matter to be only the locus of those points at which the ether is animated by vortex motions. Riemann believes it to be locus of those points at which ether is constantly destroyed; to Wiechert or Larmor, it is the locus of the points at which the ether has undergone a kind of torsion of a very particular kind. [...] Does our ether actually exist? We know the origin of our belief in the ether. " (Download it from archive.org).

-El Rey Don Pedro en Madrid y El Infanzón de Illescas, by Lope de Vega. Leer esta obra es como leer un sueño. Hiperrealista y surrealista al mismo tiempo, es decir, con mucho sentido y con ninguno a la vez. Se contrasta el lirismo exacerbado de unos con el verso prosaico (si es que tal cosa tiene sentido) de otros. Uno cree estar en una obra lorquiana tipo El público por momentos. Las escenas en las estancias del rey, actos II y III, son una locura escénica. Puertas y más puertas que conectan una infinidad de salas donde suceden hechos completamente oníricos. Como en todo sueño, la unidad global va basculando hacia delante, acompañando a la acción. Aunque por supuesto existe un motivo principal. Tan horrible, quizás, que Lope decidió vestirlo con fantasía. Me sorprende la imagen del Rey Don Pedro en comparación con los reyes de otras obras citadas anteriormente. Este es más maduro. O más tardío... En cualquier caso se trata de un Rey que todavía puede demostrar un valor real, no como los que vemos ahora. Aunque parece que la sensibilidad más allá de las fronteras de su piel es algo de lo que han carecido y carecen casi todos. Hay escenas memorables, como la de las broncas o la de Don Tello pasando de sala en sala. La Sombra es, cómo no, la que da relieve al conjunto. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-Lo Cierto por lo Dudoso, de Lope de Vega. Quizás no es el argumento más elaborado de Lope, pero sin duda es una de sus obras más líricas. La calidad del verso llega a cotas insospechadas. Y el clímax, en el que el título cobra sentido, es realmente hermoso. Un título solo para valientes, para personas que se lanzan a sentir de verdad. (Enlace de la Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes).

-La Estrella de Sevilla, de Lope de Vega. De momento es una de las mejores que he leído de Lope. Es redonda en todos los sentidos. Y el final... ¡qué final! Si estás buscando una obra para representar con no muchos personajes y que sea efectiva, esta puede ser una buena candidata. (Léela en pdf).

-The Planet of the Apes (La Planète des singes), by Pierre Boulle. Every movie is different, and so is the novel. It is an extremely suggestive and intriguing book where we can find some chapters of enormous beauty and other of extreme crudity. Read this novel and think about the experiments we perform on our closest brothers. (Do not continue reading if you do not want the novel to be spoiled). I think the author is trying to suggest that Soror is, in fact, the Earth, just as the 1968 film. Not only there are the same species, the same atmosphere, etc but the star Betelgeuse is red and big, exactly as the Sun is supposed to be when it will begin to be run out of fuel. And there is a moon, even though is smaller. Perhaps due to asteroid collisions? The continents are different, but after thousands of years the continental drift may have played its part. I think the author is suggesting that the travel to Soror is in fact a travel to the distant future Earth, while the trip back to Earth brings them to a nearer future. By the way, I find the role of the professor Antelle very intriguing, since there is no explanation for his transformation. I like the love between Ulysse and Nova. They cannot communicate by words by they fall in love. Love, which needs no reason or science. Maybe this is what makes professor Antelle to act as he does. The book is full of hints to open ends and winks to restless readers.

-Las Paces de los Reyes y Judía de Toledo, de Lope de Vega. Una obra muy enigmática llena de detalles exquisitos y momentos muy oscuros. El primer acto parece una pequeña obra separada, casi un preludio, y los dos restantes son el verdadero núcleo de la obra. No obstante el conjunto es extremadamente entretenido. El personaje de Raquel, bajo mi punto de vista, no tiene parangón en toda la literatura que conozco. Aparece tan poco pero con tanta fuerza... La evolución es trágica en el gran sentido de la palabra. El amor del rey está expresado en toda su entraña, lo cual resalta enormemente en un fondo costumbrista y artificial. Francamente me parece increíble (en el buen sentido) que Lope de Vega se atreviera a poner en boca de un rey semejantes palabras y acciones. Es, en resumen, una obra desconcertante. Una joya para descubrir por ti mismo. (Léela en html).

-A Brief History of Time, by Stephen Hawking. As I am a physicist involved in the topic of time, I cannot put myself under the perspective of a non-physicist reader, which is the target of this book. But there is a main issue that is important even for the average reader: the title is misleading because it is not a history of time. The topic of time is poorly covered. This is a book about cosmology, and as such, it is quite out-of-date, since very significant changes have occurred in the last 15 years. (For example, the accelerated expansion of the universe, which is not mentioned at least in my 2011 edition). If you are looking for an excellent book on the arrows of time I recommend you Time's Arrow and the Archimedes' Point by Huw Price. It is a bit tough but probably the best text on the arrow of time that I know of. For the history of time measurement there is an amazing book entitled Time in History by G.J. Whitrow, which I strongly recommend.

-The Secret Life of Trees by Colin Tudge. This is a wonderful book that everyone should read in order to learn incredible things about our green brothers and how important they are. Buy it now!

-El mejor alcalde, el Rey, de Lope de Vega. Deliciosa obra en la que Pelayo te hará reír de lo lindo, Sancho te hará sentir y Elvira llorar.(Léela en html).

-Valor, Fortuna y Lealtad, de Lope de Vega. Esta es la segunda parte de Los Tellos de Meneses. A mi parecer es mucho mejor que la primera. Tiene más ritmo, humor y profundidad dramática. El conjunto de las dos obras es realmente bueno. Me encantaría ver en escena los cambios constantes de vestuario...(Léela en html).

-Total immersion, by Terry Laughlin. This is a very interesting book if you are an adult trying to learn to swim well. First, it is important to mention that it only discuss front crawl stroke. Maybe some things are applicable to backstroke, but for breast and fly strokes this book is not of great help. The main point is that remarks the importance of the efficiency when you swim. And in order to increase this efficiency we learn that arms and foot are not so important as power sources. Instead, a good equilibrium and a hip rotating-stroke is more effective. The author discusses very common mistakes among amateur swimmers trying to improve the efficiency of swimming by a reduction of drag instead of by enhancing only endurance or strength. I really enjoyed, even though I got lost in many descriptions of the exercices. It is very difficult to explain a swimming exercise with words! But I got the videos and all makes sense now.

-Los Tellos de Meneses, de Lope de Vega. Esta obra es magnífica. Te transporta a un pasado rural en el que Tello el Viejo adolece de una curiosa dualidad económica. Elvira desciende de la nobleza para ponerse a servir en un acto de lo más valiente. Lope no se dedica a mostrar personajes de alto linaje enfermos de hemofilia, sino que en su caso lo real es real, incluso dentro de lo ficticio. El personaje de Tello joven no me acaba de gustar. Está a la altura de los demás cortesanos. (Léela en html).

-White Fang, by Jack London. This is probably the best book I've ever read, together with The Call of the Wild, by the same author. I am sick of the Disney-like approach to other animals that act and think as if they were humans. I am also sick of usual people, even some philosophers, who consider that they are almost automata. Some monts ago I read The Wolf by Joseph Smith and he showed to be completely unable to put himself under the skin of a wolf or other creatures. On the other hand, The Philosopher and the Wolf by Mark Rowlands is an interesting book that can complement White Fang in many ways. But the two wolf-related works by London are really superior. He is able to transmit you the mind and the spirit of other animals without humanizing and without dehumanizing them. These are two superb and symetrical stories that will spring upon you! (At Project Gutenberg you can find White Fang and The Call of the Wild)

-Los Prados de León, de Lope de Vega. Una historia de amor cruzada entre Nise y Nuño, o de cómo la nobleza crece mejor en el campo... (Enlace al pdf).

-La Dama Boba, de Lope de Vega. Magnífica obra donde se muestra cómo el amor enciende la luz del ingenio, aunque a muchos parece que se la apague. Estar dotado, ya sea de lucidez o de dote, es algo que no es constante. En cualquier caso, Lope demuestra una vez más haber amado mucho. (Versión en html).

-Las Famosas Asturianas, de Lope de Vega. Si ya conoces las andaduras de Sancho Panza es hora de ver en acción a Doña Sancha, una heroína increíblemente moderna. Es muy interesante leer a Lope en un castellano que ya para él era (quizás irónicamente) antiguo. (Léela aquí en html).

-El Perro del Hortelano, de Lope de Vega. Maravillosa obra filosófica en lo amoroso y amorosa en lo filosófico. Es inevitable pensar en la fiel película que hizo Pilar Miró. El final, como casi siempre en Lope, me parece algo precipitado. Pero el lirismo vuela a alturas increíbles. (Léela en html).

-Fuenteovejuna, de Lope de Vega. Aunque es archifamosa nunca antes la había leído, y no me ha decepcionado. Me ha parecido muy contemporánea, al menos en potencia, pues los que hoy en día gobiernan nos están inflando las narices y pueden acabar como el Comendador. Me ha parecido que tiene cierta relación con Las Bacantes de Eurípides, más que nada por el linchamiento (por decirlo de forma suave) colectivo. También me ha parecido curioso que no se diga el tópico de "Fuenteovejuna, todos a una". Esto es como lo de "Tócala otra vez, Sam, en Casablanca... (Enlace al html de la obra)."